0191 221 9800
[email protected]

Northumbria Police’s recruitment efforts to get more uniformed officers out on the streets of the North East are working and Government targets are being smashed, says Northumbria Police and Crime Commissioner, Kim McGuinness.
Yesterday the Home Office provided a national update on police uplift figures for the country and PCC McGuinness confirmed that the force is on track to not only meet Government targets but aims to exceed this by recruiting up to 133 further officers by the end of the financial year.
In line with the National Police Uplift Programme, Northumbria Police had a target to recruit 185 police officers by the end of March 2021. When reviewing plans with the Chief Constable earlier this year the PCC decided to allocate extra funding to build force recruitment figures back up, believing the Government numbers didn’t go far enough and that a greater resource is needed to serve local communities. This will therefore result in a total of 318 additional officers by March 2021 (133+185). These numbers are in addition to planned force recruitment to address regular attrition.
The latest figures show that Northumbria Police currently has 3344 serving police officers working alongside the dedicated Police Staff, PCSOs and Specials who all play such an important role in protecting the public.
Northumbria Police and Crime Commissioner, Kim McGuinness, said: “Police officer recruitment has been a top priority of mine and despite all the recent Covid-related challenges, our recruitment efforts over the last year have been really positive.
“I wanted to make sure we get more officers in post again and build the force back up after years and years of cuts to the service – our force took a real hit with austerity. Right now, I’m doing everything within my power to reverse this. The Force is growing well – we have some excellent new people who have joined us and as these new recruits complete their training, we can look forward to a greater visible presence of police officers out in our communities, making people feel safer.”
The PCC also described the force as having an ‘impressive’ number of female officers join over the last year with 48.9 per cent of new recruits being women. Nationally, women now constitute 32.7 per cent of the UK workforce, which is up from 32.6 per cent in July. For Northumbria Police it’s 34 per cent.
She said: “The number of female recruits is impressive. I can’t stress enough how important it is to me that our police force has a diverse mix of people to reflect the communities it serves. The greater the representation the better our force will be at understanding and responding to the needs of our communities, reduce crime and keep us all safe.
“Having so many women on board, many of whom also hold senior positions within our force, is just one example of how we are committed to making true representation a reality here in the North East.”
She added: “There really is some good progress happening, we just need it to go further, and faster. I know many people will want to have their say on where they want to see more police in their area, and now is the time to do so. I’d urge residents to visit my website or social media and complete my Fighting Crime, Preventing Crime survey. I want your input to help shape our force’s future.”

 

 

Our Stats

NPCC Social

A LOCAL community group is appealing for more venues to sign-up to its ‘Safe Places’ scheme to support vulnerable people across Northumberland’s towns and rural communities.

Amble-based Splinter Group supports more than 40 young adults with learning differences though a range of support sessions, social events and community initiatives such as ‘Safe Places’.

The ‘Safe Places’ scheme is part of a national network designed to help vulnerable people if they feel scared or at risk while they are out and about in the community and need support right away.

Earlier this year, Splinter Group was awarded almost £4,000 in funding from Northumbria Police and Crime Commissioner Kim McGuinness to help them expand the scheme locally to support people with learning difficulties throughout the pandemic – a time of heightened anxieties for many.

Local venues that are already on board include Blyth Community Enterprise Centre, Costa Coffee and Newbiggin Maritime Centre.

Now, members of the group are calling on other local supermarkets, coffee shops and bus stations to get in touch to see if they can help the number of Safe Spaces grow in our region.

Northumbria Police and Crime Commissioner, Kim McGuinness, said: “It’s so important that everyone is given the support they need to go about their life. Safe Places are a simple, yet effective way to ensure that support is always nearby. If you are lost, you have your wallet stolen, have been bullied or are generally feeling anxious, a Safe Place will have a sticker on its window representing that help is on offer there, everything is OK.”

She continued: “Everyone has the right to feel safe and comfortable when out in their communities and this scheme helps grow people’s confidence, helping people live independently. It can give reassurance to parents and loved ones too.

“With all that’s going on right now, we can’t afford to forget the needs of our vulnerable people – people are still catching buses, going to the shops and they could feel vulnerable at any time. That’s why schemes like this are vital. Everyone involved at Splinter Group should be so proud of everything they’ve achieved to get this scheme up and running and the more venues who get on board, the better.”

Frank of the SpLinter Group explains: “It’s important for there to be local, trained places where anxious people can call in, maybe stay while they calm down and work out what to do, then go on their way. It’s especially important at the moment and we are really pleased that PCC Kim McGuinness has recognised what we are trying to do.”

Sue Patirence from Gallery Youth Project, one of the Safe Places, a venue already on board, said: “We are really pleased to have benefited from the Safe Places training run by people who really understand what it can be like to be anxious when out and about. It’s great to be part of a scheme that can offer people a safe and welcoming space to help them recover and go on their way.”

Commissioner, Kim McGuinness is currently running a public consultation survey on Fighting Crime, Preventing Crime. As part of this she is seeking views on what work needs to be done to support young people in our communities. To have your say visit: https://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/PCPConsultation20/

 

Our Stats

NPCC Social

Northumbria Police and Crime Commissioner, Kim McGuinness has today warned that without funding for interventions to prevent young people getting caught up in gangs in the North East, we will see more lives ruined.

In a report presented to the Northumbria Police and Crime Panel this week, Kim McGuinness raised concerns that the Governments has yet to announce if Violent Reduction Units will be given funding for a third year to help continue work to tackle youth violence, including gang crime.

She explained that as a region we need to build on the good work that’s happening to prevent vulnerable, impressionable young people from becoming involved in local gang cultures, as well as supporting those who already need to escape and turn their lives around.

Several organisations in the North East, who work with the Commissioner’s Violence Reduction Unit, have also identified girls at risk of gang-related violence and their good work in this area was recently highlighted in a Westminster Hall debate on the topic of ‘Gang-associated girls’.

One organisation is Edge North East, which mentors girls and young women involved in gangs. Also making great inroads is the Children’s Society North East which has worked with more than 30 girls who are at risk of harm and exploitation due to their association with gang members.

Northumbria Police and Crime Commissioner, Kim McGuinness, explained: “We can’t shy away from the fact that gangs do operate in our region, although we are fortunate it’s at a much lower level compared to other areas. Through the organisations we are working with we are hearing first-hand some real horror stories about girls who are involved too. Many have been subjected to physical and sexual violence, forced to do drug runs, to carry and store weapons, and to drive vehicles for drug deals in the belief they are less likely to be stopped by the police. They have even allowed their bank accounts to be used to stash money.”

“These girls are often manipulated and controlled and were led to believe life as a girlfriend of a gang member is a glamorous one. They’re told they’ll be looked after and taken care off and receive the best of everything. This couldn’t be further from the truth. This is grooming.”

Kim added: “Both young men and women who get caught up in this dark world are often already vulnerable and they don’t want the life they have got caught up in, but they don’t know what to do. They have experienced so much and are frightened. They need help to get out, get away and get their life back. It often needs completely cutting ties off and this needs support.

“We have a real battle on our hands in preventing our young people from getting involved with these gangs in the first place too. Prevention is far better than prison but I do fear that time is rapidly running out for the Home Secretary to agree a third year funding for violence reduction units. Quite simply if we do not get another round of violence reduction funding in place, gang crime will continue to ruin lives.”

ENDS

Contact for further information:

Heidi Boden – [email protected] 07925148941

Adrian Pearson – [email protected] 07800 542168

Our Stats

NPCC Social

People living in Northumbria’s coastal towns are being asked to share their views on how to fight crime and prevent crime as part of a new survey launched online by Police and Crime Commissioner Kim McGuinness last week.
The survey is the key feature behind a new plan setting out what Northumbria Police should focus on in the years ahead.
Whether you’re a full-time mum, business owner, or help out at a local community group, Kim wants to know what the big issues are for you, and wants to make sure those leaving by the sea have their say.
Northumbria Police serves a wide range of communities, all with unique challenges, for example, it’s known that seaside towns often see a rise in anti-social behaviour and public order offences during hot spells and the tourist season. Kim wants to make sure we get as many views as possible around crime on the coast – this will then shape a new Police and Crime Plan outlining what the force should focus on to ensure Northumbria stays one of the safest regions in the country.
Since being elected in July 2019, one of Kim’s top priorities has been police officer recruitment and getting officers out on the streets, fighting crime and keeping everyone safe. As a result of this, the force’s latest recruitment drive has seen more than 300 officers hired since lockdown, and numbers are set to be 133 more than the Government’s uplift target.
The past year has also seen the Commissioner establish a Violence Reduction Unit which is working hard to improve lives and prevent crime and has helped towards an 18 per cent reduction in knife crime in the area before the start of the national lockdown.
Northumbria Police and Crime Commissioner, Kim McGuinness, said: “Our policing needs are constantly evolving and after ten years of austerity it’s important we take a good, hard look at our police force and think about the needs and the expectations that people have of the service and I want to make sure we are shining the light on what matters to those living by the sea. I want a really clear picture of things are in places like South Shields and Whitley Bay so we can look at how things can be improved.
“What really matters here is that you have your say. If it’s cutting down anti-social behaviour in your neighbourhood, reducing violence in our region, getting more police on our streets or a creating a future for our young people, this is the time to make it happen.”
To help get as many views as possible, Kim had also planned to take an engagement bus on tour over the coming months to meet lots of people to learn more about policing and community needs across the force area. For now, this has been postponed while the region adjusts to local lockdown, and will be re-launched once public health advice on how best to engage face to face has been considered.
When safe to do so, the whereabouts of the ‘Fighting Crime, Preventing Crime’ survey bus will be publicised on the Commissioner’s website and across her social media channels.
Kim said: “In the current climate, I can’t invite people to town halls or community centres so this is why I’m looking at taking a bus out to meet local people out in the open, touring the entire region and speaking to as many people as possible with social distancing maintained and face masks at the ready. Hopefully we’ll get the green light on this soon.
“Thankfully Northumbria is one of the safest areas in the country and I’m proud of our police force, but of course there are things we can do better. This consultation will allow us to say what needs improving and what we need to see more of. I want to hear the good, the bad, and I welcome new ideas too, it will all help our work to fight crime, prevent crime and improve lives in our region.”
Cllr Joan Atkinson, Lead Member for Area Management and Community Safety at South Tyneside Council, said: “Coastal communities face unique challenges and opportunities so it’s extremely important that people living here in South Tyneside share their thoughts on policing and community safety within the area.
“I would encourage everyone in South Tyneside to have their say by completing PCC Kim McGuinness’ survey on fighting crime and preventing crime. It’s important that you feel safe in your community so highlighting any issues or concerns you may have is key to helping North-umbria Police set out what they should focus on in the next five years, particularly around crime on the coast.”

People can respond to the survey online by visiting http://bit.ly/PCPCon2020. The consultation closes on Friday 27 November.

 

Our Stats

NPCC Social

PEOPLE living in Northumbria’s rural communities are being asked to share their views on how to fight crime and prevent crime as part of a new survey launched online by Police and Crime Commissioner Kim McGuinness last week.
The survey is the key feature behind a new plan setting out what Northumbria Police should focus on in the years ahead.
Whether you’re a full-time mum, local farmer, or help out at a local community group, Kim wants to know what the big issues are for you, and wants to make sure those living in Northumbria’s vast countryside have their say.
Northumbria Police serves a wide range of areas, all with unique challenges and rural crime is known to have a devastating effect on rural communities – its people and its businesses too.
Farm equipment, livestock thefts and sheep worrying are all typical crimes known to impact those living in rural areas but Kim wants to make sure issues like domestic abuse and violence aren’t hidden crimes that get forgotten in the remote parts of our region too.
Kim wants to make sure we get as many views as possible from throughout Northumberland – this will then shape a new Police and Crime Plan outlining what the force should focus on to ensure Northumbria stays one of the safest regions in the country.
Since being elected in July 2019, one of Kim’s top priorities has been police officer recruitment and getting officers out on the streets, fighting crime and keeping everyone safe. As a result of this, the force’s latest recruitment drive has seen more than 300 officers hired since lockdown.
The past year has also seen the Commissioner establish a Violence Reduction Unit which is working hard to improve lives and prevent crime and has helped towards an 18 per cent reduction in knife crime in the area before the start of the national lockdown.
Northumbria Police and Crime Commissioner, Kim McGuinness, said: “Our policing needs are constantly evolving and after ten years of austerity it’s important we take a good, hard look at our police force and think about the needs and the expectations that people have of the service and I want to make sure we are shining the light on what matters to those living in the more remote parts of our region. I want a really clear picture of how things are so we can look at how things can be improved.
“What really matters here is that you have your say. If it’s cutting down anti-social behaviour in your neighbourhood, reducing violence in our region, getting more police on our streets or a creating a future for our young people, this is the time to make it happen.”
To help get as many views as possible, Kim had also planned to take an engagement bus on tour over the coming months to meet lots of people to learn more about policing and community needs across the force area. For now, this has been postponed while the region adjusts to local lockdown, and will be re-launched once public health advice on how best to engage face to face has been considered.
When safe to do so, the whereabouts of the ‘Fighting Crime, Preventing Crime’ survey bus will be publicised on the Commissioner’s website and across her social media channels.
Kim said: “In the current climate, I can’t invite people to town halls or community centres so this is why I’m looking at taking a bus out to meet local people out in the open, touring the entire region and speaking to as many people as possible with social distancing maintained and face masks at the ready. Hopefully we’ll get the green light on this soon.
“Thankfully Northumbria is one of the safest areas in the country and I’m proud of our police force, but of course there are things we can do better. This consultation will allow us to say what needs improving and what we need to see more of. I want to hear the good, the bad, and I welcome new ideas too, it will all help our work to fight crime, prevent crime and improve lives in our region.”
Northumberland County Council Leader Glen Sanderson said: “It’s important people have their say on the things that affect them and policing is no exception.
“While we live in a low-crime area there are still issues which impact on both our rural and ur-ban areas. By getting involved in this consultation residents can help further improve the po-lice service in the county.”

People can respond to the survey online by visiting http://bit.ly/PCPCon2020. The consultation closes on Friday 27 November.

 

ENDS

Our Stats

NPCC Social

Get in touch today to find out how we can help you!

Exit
Site